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Neith

Giovanni Domenico Cassini, one of the most well-known astronomers of his time, had noticed an object close to Venus in the year 1672. He had noticed it again 14 years later and recorded it in his own journal, predicting that it was the quarter the size of Venus.

A countless number of astronomers tried to find this mysterious object; most had found it, but the rest could not find it at all. Many believed it was a planet or a moon of Venus, but still, people had dismissed it as an optical illusion since it was so hard to find for some people.

In 1884, a man named M. Hozeau had analyzed his calculations and figured out that the object couldn't be a moon, it had to be a planet. It had a 283-day orbit around the sun. The planetoid was named Neith, after the mysterious Egyptian god Sais.

Soon, the discovery rate started to diminish, until eventually, no one could find it again. Many people have different stories to what the many astronomers must have saw. It could have been a star, or a short-lived nova. Some even believe that the astronomers were looking at Mercury, and were too stupid to know!